While We Own the Mystery

Holy Trinity
May 27, 2018
Romans 11:33-36
Trinity Lutheran Church—New Haven, MO

Oh, the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God. How unsearchable His judgments and inscrutable His ways. For who knew the mind of the Lord? Or who became His counselor? Or who gave a gift to Him and he will be repaid? For from Him and through Him and to Him are all things. To Him be glory forever. Amen.

In the name of the Father and of the + Son and of the Holy Spirit.

2.

There is a German saying, attributed to Martin Luther (although it likely belongs to the apocryphal sayings of Luther), that goes like this: Wenn es zur Theologie kommt, eine gewiße Bescheidenheit gehört dazu; “When it comes to theology, a certain humility is called for.” (I’m taking my German qualifier exam in a couple weeks, so I need the practice). What this saying get to is that there is a temptation once you learn a little bit of theology, to think that you have all the answers, to be so certain and sure that you are right, that you have no qualms about telling everyone else about how wrong they are. This is something of a plague for first-year seminarians, who dig deeper into theology than they ever have before, and mistakenly think that after reading a couple of books that they have all the right answers. Some of us shake off that notion, but it’s not easy to do. After learning a little bit of theology, it is still necessary to be trained in the school of experience by the Holy Spirit, which often involves large doses of humility.

The same is true of lay men and women. When it comes to theology, there is a certain superiority that manifests itself. But while you may have one or two answers, you definitely don’t have them all. This quest for certainty originates more in modern philosophical and scientific pursuits, which seek to discover all the secrets of the universe, than in the faith of Jesus Christ. Trust the LORD with all your heart, and don’t depend on your own understanding, goes the Proverb (3:5).

In fact, sometimes answers are not even the most important part of theology. More important is to be able to ask the right questions. Because there is no right answer to a wrong question. Our questions get us in trouble, because we question where we ought not.

Today, let us take a cue from St. Paul, the leading theologian of the Christian Church, and his letter to the Romans, which exceeds entire libraries of theology written since then in its presentation of the faith. After exploring the topics of sin, righteousness, faith, good works, baptism, new life in Christ, and predestination, he simply has to stop and marvel at what he doesn’t know.

Oh, the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God. How unsearchable His judgments and inscrutable His ways. For who knew the mind of the Lord? Or who became His counselor? Or who gave a gift to Him and he will be repaid? For from Him and through Him and to Him are all things. To Him be glory forever. Amen.

When it comes to theology, a certain humility is called for. You have to know when to stop. You have to know when you cannot answer any further. You simply must exclaim that God’s judgments and ways are so far above our own, that that no one is able to mine the knowledge of God to its depths. You have to admit that you cannot know the mind of the Lord, you cannot be His counselor. There is a time to open your mouth and speak, but it is just as important to be able to recognize when you should shut your mouth and be silent. The Preacher says in Ecclesiastes, “There is an appointed time for everything…a time to be silent and a time to talk” (Eccl 3:1a; 7b).

1.

We just confessed the Athanasian Creed, one of the three ecumenical (or, universal) creeds of the Christian Church. Its Trinitarian theology is unmatched. In fact, it is my opinion that the Athanasian Creed is the full extent of what we in our limited capabilities are able to say concerning the Trinity; to say more is to land in heresy. And the thing about the Athanasian Creed is that you probably understand the Trinity as little after you say it as you did before you say it. I also think that’s part of the point. The Trinity is a mystery. Let’s keep it a mystery, and confess what God gives us to confess in His name, the name of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

Holy Father, Holy Son, / Holy Spirit, three we name Thee; / Though in essence only one, / Undivided God we claim Thee / And, adoring, bend the knee / While we own the mystery.

For from Him and through Him and to Him are all things. Hey, that sounds awfully Trinitarian, doesn’t it? I think I’ll shut my mouth now.

To God Be Glory Forever

 

Amen.
Jacob W Ehrhard
VD+MA